Repurchase Agreement Finance


If the Fed wants to tighten the money supply, hungry for liquidity, it sells the bonds to commercial banks through a pension purchase contract or a brief repot. Later, they will buy back the securities through a re-pension and bring money back into the system. Buyback contracts can be concluded between a large number of parties. The Federal Reserve enters into pension contracts to regulate money supply and bank reserves. Individuals generally use these agreements to finance the purchase of bonds or other investments. Pension transactions are short-term assets with maturity terms called “rate,” “term” or “tenor.” Pension transactions are generally considered to be a reduction in credit risk. The biggest risk in a repo is that the seller does not maintain his contract by not repuring the securities he sold on the due date. In these cases, the purchaser of the guarantee can then liquidate the guarantee in an attempt to recover the money he originally paid. However, the reason this is an inherent risk is that the value of the warranty may have decreased since the first sale and therefore cannot leave the buyer with any choice but to maintain the security he never wanted to maintain in the long term, or to sell it for a loss. On the other hand, this transaction also poses a risk to the borrower; If the value of the guarantee increases beyond the agreed terms, the creditor cannot resell the guarantee. When the Federal Reserve`s open market committee intervenes in open market transactions, pension transactions add reserves to the banking system and withdraw them after a specified period; Rest first reverses the flow reserves, then add them again. This instrument can also be used to stabilize interest rates and the Federal Reserve has used it to adjust the policy rate to the target rate.

[16] There is also a risk that the securities in question will depreciate before the due date, in which case the lender may lose money in the transaction.

Posted Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 at 11:13 pm
Filed Under Category: Uncategorized
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