I’ve collected a number of sunset photos over the past eight or nine days.   As water temperatures begin to fall, stripers are moving into shallower water where they can find cover while chasing bait.  I’ve been setting our drifts over humps in the 4 to 5 foot range in the flats around Kent, Poplar, and Tighlman Islands.  While almost any kind of top-water lure will work, I prefer Lonely Anglers, Stillwater SmackIts, and Heddon Super Spooks.  The fish can bite anytime, but they always turn on right about the time the sun hits the western horizon. There have been a few birds working in the shallows, but some of the most successful trips have just been blind-casting over structure.  Any area where the bottom comes up a foot or more over the surrounding flat can hold fish. Aquatic grass is a plus. Good water quality is essential.  So is flowing current.  That’s been somewhat hard to come by lately. Hurricane Earl has made its way past the mouth of the Chesapeake and up the Atlantic Seaboard with very little impact on our region except for a disruption in the normal tidal patterns.  I’ve been compensating by fishing areas where there is most likely to be stronger currents such as the mouths of major rivers or near the narrows around the islands. We’re occasionally getting a nice fish or two around the bridge and there are still a few Spanish mackerel in the area.

Here are the sunset pics.  As always, click them to see a higher resolution version.

Related posts:

High Water
Six Tips for Choosing a Top-water Rod
Refining Top-water Techniques for Big Stripers The Next Level
Smoke ’em in the Grass – Video
The Importance of Water Temperature & Salinity

Posted Friday, September 3rd, 2010 at 5:33 pm
Filed Under Category: Fishing Reports
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Responses to “Top-Water Sunsets”

  1. daniel kimbro says:

    awesome. love the last one at the bridge.

  2. Rivercat says:

    That’s one heck of a collage Shawn! Thanks for the report, and thanks for the opportunity to learn from you first hand. You have a great eye for photography.

    Don

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